old enough to know better

August 29th
19:23
Via
sklogw:

This image of Neptune was taken on 11 August 2006 with the Palomar Observatory’s 200-inch (5-meter) Hale Telescope and its Adaptive Optics  system.  The Adaptive Optics system removes the blurring effects of Earth’s atmosphere to produce very high resolution images.
Don Banfield of Cornell University collected and processed the data to produce this false color image. The image was recorded in three near-infrared wavelengths: “J” centered at 1.250 microns, “H” at 1.635 microns, and “Ks” at 2.150. The images were combined as red, green, and blue to create this false-color image. A wide assortment of clouds can be seen at Neptune’s atmosphere.
This image of Neptune was taken on 11 August 2006 with the Palomar Observatory’s 200-inch (5-meter) Hale Telescope and its Adaptive Optics  system.  The Adaptive Optics system removes the blurring effects of Earth’s atmosphere to produce very high resolution images.
Don Banfield of Cornell University collected and processed the data to produce this false color image. The image was recorded in three near-infrared wavelengths: “J” centered at 1.250 microns, “H” at 1.635 microns, and “Ks” at 2.150. The images were combined as red, green, and blue to create this false-color image. A wide assortment of clouds can be seen at Neptune’s atmosphere.
Click here to load a page where you can see the individual frames and control the rotation.
The research was based on observations obtained at the Hale Telescope, Palomar Observatory, as part of a collaborative agreement between the California Institute of Technology, its divisions Caltech Optical Observatories and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (operated for NASA), and Cornell University.

sklogw:

This image of Neptune was taken on 11 August 2006 with the Palomar Observatory’s 200-inch (5-meter) Hale Telescope and its Adaptive Optics  system.  The Adaptive Optics system removes the blurring effects of Earth’s atmosphere to produce very high resolution images.

Don Banfield of Cornell University collected and processed the data to produce this false color image. The image was recorded in three near-infrared wavelengths: “J” centered at 1.250 microns, “H” at 1.635 microns, and “Ks” at 2.150. The images were combined as red, green, and blue to create this false-color image. A wide assortment of clouds can be seen at Neptune’s atmosphere.

This image of Neptune was taken on 11 August 2006 with the Palomar Observatory’s 200-inch (5-meter) Hale Telescope and its Adaptive Optics  system.  The Adaptive Optics system removes the blurring effects of Earth’s atmosphere to produce very high resolution images.

Don Banfield of Cornell University collected and processed the data to produce this false color image. The image was recorded in three near-infrared wavelengths: “J” centered at 1.250 microns, “H” at 1.635 microns, and “Ks” at 2.150. The images were combined as red, green, and blue to create this false-color image. A wide assortment of clouds can be seen at Neptune’s atmosphere.

Click here to load a page where you can see the individual frames and control the rotation.

The research was based on observations obtained at the Hale Telescope, Palomar Observatory, as part of a collaborative agreement between the California Institute of Technology, its divisions Caltech Optical Observatories and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (operated for NASA), and Cornell University.

February 22nd
09:20
Via
spaceisbig:

Neptune and its massive storms, including the Great Dark Spot. Taken by Voyager 2 on August 24, 1989.

spaceisbig:

Neptune and its massive storms, including the Great Dark Spot. Taken by Voyager 2 on August 24, 1989.

January 24th
09:17
Via
January 16th
09:31
Via
January 5th
16:42
16:39